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Press Resources for Lewis and Clark Collection

Current Press Releases

None at this time. Note: To use other images from an exhibit currently on display, please contact USA Aloft.

Past Press Releases

USA Aloft announces an illustrated talk about Lewis and Clark by photographer David Saxe at Massabesic Audubon Center in Auburn, NH on Sunday, March 15, 2009 from 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm.  [PDF

USA Aloft announces an illustrated talk about Lewis and Clark by photographer David Saxe at Peabody Mill Environmental Center in Amherst, NH on Saturday, November 3, 2007 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm.  [PDF]

USA Aloft announces the opening of its Lewis and Clark Exhibit at Prescott Farm Audubon Center in Laconia..  This exhibit runs July 9 through August 31.  A talk and Artist Reception is scheduled for July 26, 2007 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm. [PDF]

A press release from USA Aloft concerning the Lewis and Clark Exhibit at Massabesic Audubon Center is available.  This exhibit runs May 5 - June 23.  A talk and Artist Reception is scheduled for June 2, 2007 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm. [PDF]

Sample Images from the Exhibit

Images are supplied as full resolution jpg files containing IPTC information. The full resolution images have varying dpi and are intended to provide the maximum number of pixels.  A reduced version of each image, 5 inches across at 200 dpi is also supplied. The IPTC caption information is shown here along with additional background information for each image.  

These images are supplied for print use only.  We have unfortunately had some difficulty with unauthorized use of images. Therefore, the links to the full and reduced resolution images have been password protected. To apply for a password or to have a copy of an image emailed, please contact USA Aloft at the email address in the press release.    For use online, please contact USA Aloft 

Great Egret

Full Resolution Version  200 dpi Reduced Resolution Version

Caption: A great egret takes flight from a flood plain near the mouth of the Missouri River, just north of St. Louis. Lewis and Clark left this point on May 14, 1804 returning 28 months later in September 1806.
Additional background: National Wildlife Refuges and parks along the route provide magnificent venues for bird photography. This flock was in the marshland seen near the confluence of the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers. 

Yellowstone River

Full Resolution Version  200 dpi Reduced Resolution Version

Caption: The Yellowstone River (entering from the left) joins the Missouri River at the Montana - North Dakota border near Williston, ND. The expedition split during the return journey in Montana with Clark's party exploring the Yellowstone. Near this spot in August 1806, the parties rejoined and continued down the Missouri toward St. Louis.
Additional background: Later, several forts were built at the confluence, one military, the other by a fur trading company at the Ft. Union Trading Post. In this aerial image, the Yellowstone flows in from the left, while the Missouri continues upstream into the distance.

Bitterroot Mountains

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Caption: View from Indian Post Office along the Lolo Trail atop the Bitterroot Mountains in Idaho. The expedition spent two grueling weeks fighting starvation and freezing weather as they crossed this rugged terrain in September, 1805.
Additional background: The expedition camped here in 8" of new snow at just over 7000 feet in mid September. There was no game to be found and the expedition survived by eating their horses and "portable soup." This formulation of condensed soup was sealed in lead containers and has been credited by some as an indication that in addition to malnutrition, expedition members may have suffered lead poisoning

Contemplation

Full Resolution Version  200 dpi Reduced Resolution Version

Caption: A Lewis and Clark re-enactor rests between demonstrations of flint and steel fire making at reconstructed Fort Clatsop near Astoria, OR where the expedition spent the winter of 1805/06.
Additional background: The expedition had surveyed a route to the Pacific. Soon trade up and down the Missouri River system would open up the Louisiana territory, spurred in large part by the expedition's reports of the rich lands. Jefferson's vision of a continental destiny for the young nation would be realized. To fully appreciate the ensuing growth, consider that a 90 or 100-year-old person today has lived nearly half of the time since this wild untamed land was first explored by the expedition. In that spirit, this picture of a Lewis and Clark re-enactor at Ft. Clatsop, taken during a break from describing flint and steel fire making, is entitled "Contemplation."

Indian Pony

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Caption: Near Fort Yates, ND, a pony stands on the prairie that looks much like it did when Lewis and Clark passed here in 1805 and 1806.
Additional background: Horses had only been known in this region for about 100 years when Lewis and Clark traveled the region.

Buffalo

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Caption: Buffalo at the Triple U Ranch, location for Dances with Wolves, northwest of Pierre, SD. Lewis and Clark passed westbound through this region in September 1804.
Additional background: More correctly, the American Bison, had ranged almost to the Atlantic Ocean, but was first seen by the expedition in western Missouri in June. These were photographed near Bismarck, North Dakota on the Triple U Ranch. Home to over 3500 head of buffalo, Triple U was the location for Dances with Wolves.

Photographer David Saxe: "Self Portraits"

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Caption: "Self Portraits" Photographer David Saxe and his Kodak camera take their own picture.
Additional background: Since 2001, photographer David Saxe has crossed the country three times documenting the Lewis and Clark Trail both from the air and from the ground. Mr. Saxe exhibits and lectures about the Lewis and Clark expedition and his experiences documenting the trail using stills and an aerial movie. Visit www.usaaloft.com for current information.